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Thread: Reloading

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by MP Gunther View Post
    Just wondering, I don't reload but, how often do you or should you reuse the brass?
    It depends on several factors. First of all, what you reload, straight wall pistol, or necked rifle. Barrel tolerances come into play too. I had to change out my lose tolerances Glock barrel for a much tighter Lone Wolf. The lone Wolf expands the brass .006 less. That may not sound like much, but the more brass is stressed, the shorter the life.

  2. #22
    I sometimes see used ones on eBay. Would there be any concern buying used reloading equipment?

  3. #23
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    If the price seems to good to be true then maybe somethings up. A lot of people get all their reloading gear then decide later that they really aren't into it.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by SpringOWeiler View Post
    If the price seems to good to be true then maybe somethings up. A lot of people get all their reloading gear then decide later that they really aren't into it.
    I really need to meet someone who reloads and watch how they set up a new caliber and other things that are hard to find on YouTube.

  5. #25
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    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/423...ProductFinding

    This is what I started with and still use. I have access to a dillon 550B if need be but I still enjoy the single stage.
    Just think of it this way for most non military rifle cartridges. $50 Die Kit, ~$100 new brass and 100 bullets, $4 100 primers, $25 lb of powder.

  6. #26
    After the initial costs, is reloading worth it?
    Yes, if you want loads tuned to you and for less per round than factory.
    Discuss where you buy brass, powder, primers and bullets.
    Either on-line or local gun shop. Gun shows can, sometimes, be good.
    Question:
    Use new or once fired brass.
    Depends on the cartridge. Rifle, I buy new. Most pistols, I buy once fired or range pick-up
    How to tumble brass and get shiny brass. What your method.
    Tumbling? Wet or Dry.
    I only care about the case exterior getting clean and not shiny. 30 minutes in 20/40 corn is more than enough. All that is needed is to wipe off the case exterior on a rag. Anything beyond that is for YOUR pleasure and not for any other reason.

  7. #27
    Check out Dillion Press . . . . http://www.dillonprecision.com/
    There are many great machines to use for reloading but I have yet to hear any complaints about a Dillion.
    Your education has just begun and as far as costs go . . . . . It depends on how much you want to shoot.
    The more you shoot the better the investment . . . . Plus you never has the problem of running out of ammo.

    But as the saying goes . . . . There are books written about this subject.
    And it makes a great winter project as you load for the summer matches . . . . . Yeppie-Ki-Yea!
    Proposed 28th Amendment to the United States Constitution: "Congress shall make no law that applies to the citizens of the United States that does not apply equally to any and all elected officials."

    "Ignorance is our only limitation."
    "Don't let anyone tell you what can't be done."

    NRA Member
    California Rifle and Pistol Association member
    Webmaster for: http://www.redwoodpracticalshooters.org

  8. #28
    Buy a reloading manual and read it.
    If you have been saving your brass cases, you already have the #1 or #2 most expensive component at hand.
    Price ammo and then price bullets. Add 1-2 cents for powder and 1-2 cents for primers and see what you could save for yourself.
    Lee makes a perfectly functional press for about $25 (Lee Reloading Press). It isn't a joy to use, but it does work. I have two. Then you need a balance/scale to weigh powder and a ram-prime to prime cases and Lee dies for your cartridge. After than, add in whatever you learn from your manual(s) and other reading that you might like.

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