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Thread: What is your stance on the 2nd Amendment. Do you think we need some gun control?

  1. #21
    Senior Member GlassWolf's Avatar
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    In short, like many laws on the books today, a ban on violent felons possessing a handgun gives the legal system leverage when they are arrested, for whatever reason.. be it being picked up dealing drugs, or in the process of an assault, or after the fact.. If they are caught with a gun, it's one more charge in the court system that can be used to leverage a plea deal and put them away without a lengthy and costly court trial procedure.

    You could argue that doing this leads to the imprisonment of the not guilty individuals who can't afford decent representation, but I also blame that on the overall structure of our legal system today, among other things.
    I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.
    Robert A. Heinlein

  2. #22
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    I'm a strong believer in the 2nd amendment but only when it comes to guns. Some ppl think that ''the right to bare arms'' means whatever weaponary they want e.g napalm. Napalm is a weapon but it should only be used by the U.S Military however we know there's nut jobs out there who think they're intitled to it. I do however think everyone once they turn eighteen should own a gun! guns are for our protection in case something happens just like a fire extinguisher we all should own one incase something happens do we want something to happen such as a fire or home invasion no but we should have the proper equipment incase it does. I'd rather have a gun and never use it than need it and not have it!

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by GlassWolf View Post
    In short, like many laws on the books today, a ban on violent felons possessing a handgun gives the legal system leverage when they are arrested, for whatever reason.. be it being picked up dealing drugs, or in the process of an assault, or after the fact.. If they are caught with a gun, it's one more charge in the court system that can be used to leverage a plea deal and put them away without a lengthy and costly court trial procedure.

    You could argue that doing this leads to the imprisonment of the not guilty individuals who can't afford decent representation, but I also blame that on the overall structure of our legal system today, among other things.
    That same argument can be made (actually stronger) for non convicts. I've heard it from plenty of liberals.
    Its a lot easier to get charges through on someone who has a criminal history, opposed to someone who doesn't.

  4. #24
    Senior Member GlassWolf's Avatar
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    The problem is, if someone has already shown a propensity toward violence, letting them legally possess a firearm isn't a good omen.
    I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.
    Robert A. Heinlein

  5. #25
    Well now we are back to square one.

    The argument against gun control is that if we implement gun control, only the criminals will have guns. So...we argue (and I agree) that it doesn't work.
    How is this any different?

    If we could prove that ex con's are more likely to engage in violence than the general population, would that be a reasonable argument to enfore gun control?

    On the same note, what if we could prove that people that live in an urban or city setting are more likely to engage in violence than those in rural areas...do we enact gun control there?

    The argument is the same - there are bad people in the world, thankfully they are vastly outnumbered by good people.

  6. #26
    Senior Member GlassWolf's Avatar
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    It's called liability in a litigious society.
    I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.
    Robert A. Heinlein

  7. #27
    Senior Member Iwap_Evile's Avatar
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    Gun control is like trying to reduce drunk driving by making it harder for sober people to own cars

  8. #28
    Senior Member Gunnr's Avatar
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    Hey guys, I been thinking and there are a lot of criminals that are "white collar" types and were never violent or physically hurtful to others. Yet if they are convicted of a feloney they cant posess a fire arm. BUT in such cases even though its costly and time consuming they still have a right to go before a judge and plead their case to have their record expunged for the purpose of protection in which case after the judge agrees that this person is not a violent human and has paid their dept to society they may then be given the right to own a gun. If a person takes the proper steps time and money to plead his or her case do you think they deserve the chance to prove they are now a law abiding citizen? Just a thought....
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  9. #29
    Senior Member GlassWolf's Avatar
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    Yes, because I have a friend to whom this has happened. When he was 16 or 17, he used another person's credit card to run up a bill buying some stuff and got caught. (My own sister was caught doing this with her roommate's card in college.. her "rebellious streak" before she went on to get her PhD in Phys Therapy) Now here's the kicker. The owner of the card turned my friend into the Secret Service for "mail fraud) (items were sent to his house) as well as illegal use of the card, which made it a Federal case, and he was tried as an adult, and convicted. He's now in his 40s, and has a wife and kids, and it seems like a lifetime ago. He did at one point, have his record expunged as you'd mentioned. He's now a productive, middle class employee for a big company, and lives his life as a normal citizen. In his case, the record was wipred so he could get a job without "felon" being on the resume and application. I do believe this action is a reasonable one.
    I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.
    Robert A. Heinlein

  10. #30
    Senior Member MP Gunther's Avatar
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    I agree Glasswolf! I don't believe the violent "criminally minded" have less propensity to commit crimes when released, probably more so

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